Glimpses of My Garden in July

We live in a little valley where two creeks meet. According to the old timers there is an Indian saying that tornadoes will not pass through an area where two creeks meet. So far we have not had a tornado here, so the trees are big and tall shading much of the garden.

our place

In the photo above are the trees that run along the creek, which is dry now. That is usual for the end of July and August. What is not usual is the cooler temperatures we’ve been having that are keeping everything so lush and green this time of year. Today we are expecting a high of 72 degrees and lots of rain, even flash flooding. The rain will fill up the creek.

This year the surprise lilies have burst into bloom in abundance dancing around the wisteria in the midst of the grass I’ve neglected to pull out…

surprise lilies

Here they are reflected in the bird bath…

 

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I added them to my most recent bouquet along with gladiolas, phlox, cosmos, hydrangea, sage, purple cone flowers and salvia all from my garden…

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I love my blue birdbath. When it broke I replaced it, and my cheffingitwithsarah daughter decided to use the old stand in her kitchen herb garden. So when I walk out the back door this is what I see…

 

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The leaves all about the little bird that look like nasturtium, which is what we thought they were at first, have turned out to be a pesty weed that is taking over this bed called Dollar Weed , but they are edible and supposedly are great in salads, so maybe they are not so pesty after all. In fact, Sarah might use them for pesto… 😉

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The cucumbers are planted like a river along side the gladiolas this year…

cukes

We are just beginning to harvest these cukes, as I always plant them late. According to a pumpkin farmer I met years ago, if you wait to plant them after June 1st, the cucumber beetles will already have migrated through, and they will leave your plants alone. So I plant late, and I plant in a different place each year. So far this has been working for me.

My perennial bed with the pergola and strawberry bed in the background…

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Hostas are almost finished blooming now. They have looked beautiful all summer with the cooler temperatures…

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I love hiding little bird sculptures here and there in the yard. Here is my favorite…

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And of course there are my real birds…

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We are having a very abundant tomato harvest. I’ll have some pics of those next time…

 

 

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Starting from Scratch…

That’s what it feels like this year. Everything died in the hoop house during the frigid December freezes, and I’ve had a cold/flu for a month, so I haven’t felt like doing anything, but I’m better and things are getting rolling around here…thanks to my gardener daughter Anna. 🙂

She roto-tilled in the clover cover crop on this new plot near the hoop house…

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And planted these seeds from the Natural Gardening Company

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Lettuces, spinach, chard, bok choi, beets… can’t wait!!!  I thought the seed prices were very reasonable. We’ll see how they perform.

I soaked the beet seeds overnight. Something that was suggested on the seed packet that I’ve never done before, but according to them it will boost the germination.

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While Anna did all the hard work, I busied myself starting seeds in flats…

3I have several different heirloom tomato varieties that I bought at a Farmer’s Market in Holland, Michigan, and saved the seeds, and I have my special Down to Earth Digs seeds bought from Stacey on Etsy

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Last year we began to convert our large back yard into something productive, a large strawberry bed with 2 fruit trees.  We had a pretty good harvest of strawberries, and an overwhelming abundance of  cucumbers that I planted under the baby trees. Now we’ve added a new garden space in our back yard. You can see it  in the distance…

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It really feels a lot like starting all over again from scratch, and everything looks so brown and drab and dreary.

Thank you to Tera, who bought me the beautiful Freesia featured at the top of the post. 🙂 How bright and beautiful, a reminder that soon, very soon there will be color in our gardens again.

Oh…and I did keep the rooster, and I’m calling him Darcy. Thanks to vuchickens for the great suggestion. 😉

Liriope

Monkey Grass

Liriope or Monkey Grass…Love this plant…so sturdy and dependable, thrives in my shady yard and in the heat of August sends out these beautiful blue shoots of tiny flowers… Love it!

June Flowers

A bit late here…can’t believe it’s the last day of June, but I wanted to squeeze in some  pics of the flowers blooming this past week…

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Daylily

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rose

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And a bouquet including garlic scapes in the beautiful pitcher Sage gave me…

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June…

Daylilies…

daylilies

Gotta’ love them…

Looking back in time I planted a spring clover cover crop to turnover and plant the pumpkins in. It took along time to come up, but here it is now ready to be tilled…

clover

The bermuda is so prolific in these here parts that covering it with newspaper, landscape cloth and 6 inches of mulch didn’t deter it. In fact it seemed to thrive. So gardener daughter Anna covered all around the tomatoes with cardboard. It still peeped through…

grass

So now I picked out most of the bermuda and put 6 -8  inches of hay over the whole bed…

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Baby Ameraucana chicks have a new nursery…

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It’s in the old chick coop that was built in the stall. The window panel in the front gives them more light during the day and can be taken out at night and the big door closed for their protection.

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We are getting 3-4 eggs a day from the Marans hens. Ever since the rooster Copper was killed and the broody hen fiasco, the older hens have stopped laying. Or they are laying somewhere else and I can’t find the eggs.  Here they are having an afternoon snack. We have not had any sign of the coyote, and have not trapped any other critters. So far…so good.

chickens