Ice Encrusted World

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Woke up this morning to an ice encrusted world…

Iced sage, anyone???

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How about a picnic???

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The heavy laden tree branches are falling to the ground with a crackling sound…

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And yet, I love icicles… and the awesome glittering beauty of it all…

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I hear we are expecting 4 to 6 inches of snow to top it off…

Beauty Berries and Broody Emma

I never get tired of pulling together all the different plants that are blooming at the moment. What got me inspired this time was the  purple of the Hyacinth Bean blooming in the garden and the Beauty Berry bushes growing in my yard…

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And a  little closer shot…

fall bouquet

I also grabbed some purple grasses, sage, Lamb’s ear, Autumn Sedum Joy, and of course the beautiful brightly colored zinnias…

Here’s a close-up of the Beauty Berries…

beauty berries

But all things are not so beautiful. When I left for a week I put my starting plants of cabbage and broccoli inside the house, so that my husband would remember to water them. And he did, but this is what they looked like when I got home…

cabbage

I can’t even imagine what got them inside the house and I don’t see a sign of anything anywhere. The strange thing is that when I went out to the greenhouse  all the cilantro and radishes I planted in there look just the same as this. The kale and bok choy is completely gone…

>>>Sigh<<<

On another note…Broody Emma is really serious this time laying on her 14 eggs…

Emma

She’s still under the porch. I would like to leave her there, but I just am not sure. If we move her we will have to take up two boards off the porch. I know a skunk or possum or raccoon could get to her fairly easily, unless we put chicken wire around her like one of you suggested, but where she is, it would be very hard to even put the chicken wire.

I’ll let you know what we decide to do…

Good-bye August…

Just a few more things to post before September…

Who would have thought of putting tomato vines in flower bouquets???

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The answer: The Seasonal Bouquet Project, if you haven’t checked out their blog you should take a peek… 🙂

This bouquet from August’s bounty has marigolds, sage, zinnias, tomato vines, oat grass, salvia, and catmint…

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bouquet

Seedlings for the fall garden are growing…

seedlings

And I’m getting ready to do a September challenge of 30 Paintings in 30 days starting tomorrow. I painted a few ahead of time because I’ll be on a trip for one week in September.  But here is one I did called Farm Girls…

Farm Girls

This was from a photo taken back in June when the tornado went through Moore, Oklahoma and hit my son’s barn… We planted a flower garden for them while the guys picked up debris…  The story is here A Flower Garden and a Tornado All Mixed Together.

If you would like you can follow my 30 days of painting over at    a little corner of the artist in me…

Surprise Lilies

A few days ago I noticed the emergence of these Surprise Lilies, also known as Naked Ladies…

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It is surprising how the long stalks come up out of the seemingly bare ground over night and in a few days blossom into lovely flowers.

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Last night we had an unexpected thunderstorm that knocked some of the lilies down. I cut them and made a bouquet in my favorite pitcher/vase along with phlox, sage, and purple cone flowers…

 

bouquet

A little interesting info about Surprise Lilies from the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture:

With the arrival of August, gardeners throughout the state are delighted to see their gaudy and somewhat ungainly surprise lilies come into bloom. These bulbous plants belong to the amaryllis family and are native to southern Japan.

The five to seven pink four inch long trumpets are produced atop the pale, naked three foot tall stems and always remind me of a flock of flamingos standing in a shallow pool at Disney World. The flowers are sterile and do not develop seed pods.

The bulbs are as long as three inches in diameter with long necks and persist for years once established. The foliage comes up in late winter and looks like a large-leafed clump of daffodils, but without flowers. There will be one bloom for about every 10 leaves produced by the clump. The leaves die away with the arrival of the first warm days of late spring, usually disappearing below ground by late May. This growth pattern is an adaptation of the species to survive in an area with moist springs and prolonged periods of summer drought.

Something Sweet for Sage

My daughter Sage, that is, not the plant. 🙂

She handed me a long ruffled linen skirt and asked me to make an apron out of it.

So here it is…

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I found the cute fabric at a near by quilt shop…just love this…

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And I have enough of the skirt left to do one more. 🙂

There you go, Sage… ❤

Herb Labels

Just had to share these beautiful  labels for Herbs from World Label

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And there are more… even shopping lists and recipe cards that you can print off.

I saw these over at Rachel’s blog   Happily Occupied Homebodies where she shared her very clever idea using these cute labels. You should go have a look. 🙂

And take a look at the labels too…  Labels for your Herb Jars

Winter Wreath

This isn’t exactly out of the vegetable garden, but I did use Sage in this wreath and everything else from around our property. We have lots of cedar trees which I love, but most people here hate them, and Juniper with beautiful blue berries…

 

Juniper berries copy

and Nandina berries which are nice and red…

Nandina berries

And here it is…

Winter wreath

We didn’t use a form we just wrapped florist twine around the branches and tied them together to make a circle. We also added boxwood branches and sage…

 

Winter wreath3 copy

And here’s a side view…

Winter wreath2

So, there we go a winter wreath for free… : )